Posts tagged Kaivalyadhama
Swami Kuvalyananda (30 August 1883 - 18 April 1966), founder of Kaivalyadham, said to his student O.P. Tiwari some days before his death, “I have brought up this institution out if nothing, and if it goes to nothing, I don’t mind, but yoga should not be diluted.” 
  Swamiji was the first to subject yogic practices to thorough scientific investigation, and he   rejected anything that was disproved in the laboratory. “Do not claim that yoga can treat every disorder,” he told O.P. Tiwari in the same meeting at his Kuti. “Every therapy has limitations, and yoga too.”  From the souvenir program of Kaivalyadham’s 7th International Conference, December 2012, pp. 10-11.   
  “Through his continuous and missionary zeal in promoting research and  yoga  therapy, he built Kaivalyadham,” said Subodh Tiwari in 2000. Today, nearly a hundred years later, the institute continues to be a globally respected hub for learning and practicing yoga.

Swami Kuvalyananda (30 August 1883 - 18 April 1966), founder of Kaivalyadham, said to his student O.P. Tiwari some days before his death, “I have brought up this institution out if nothing, and if it goes to nothing, I don’t mind, but yoga should not be diluted.”

Swamiji was the first to subject yogic practices to thorough scientific investigation, and he rejected anything that was disproved in the laboratory. “Do not claim that yoga can treat every disorder,” he told O.P. Tiwari in the same meeting at his Kuti. “Every therapy has limitations, and yoga too.” From the souvenir program of Kaivalyadham’s 7th International Conference, December 2012, pp. 10-11.

“Through his continuous and missionary zeal in promoting research and yoga therapy, he built Kaivalyadham,” said Subodh Tiwari in 2000. Today, nearly a hundred years later, the institute continues to be a globally respected hub for learning and practicing yoga.

In Prana Resides Truth

Swami Kuvalyananda stated his primary objective thus: “The main effort of the Kaivalyadhama is in scientifically probing the human mind and to dig deeper and deeper in the inner space, till the effort to conquer the outer and inner spaces converge and ultimately meet to solve the riddle of the cosmos.”

Author Joseph S. Alter takes the idea a little further: “The more yoga is subject to science, and the closer one gets to discovering the nature of prana, the more powerful yoga becomes as a means by which to discover truth.”

From the third chapter of Alter’s book, Yoga in Modern India: The Body Between Science and Philosophy (Princeton University Press: 2004), p. 101.